WISDOM

02/27/2018

Guest Post by Rodger Price, Executive Coach

As the founder of an executive coaching consultancy, I have the incredible privilege of caring for leaders and helping them grow. As such, I’ve been asked if I might share some insights about how to care for leaders.

Here are a few thoughts:

  • Unless you have strong reasons to do otherwise, trust them by being quick to do what they ask of you without second guessing their motives.
  • Trust them by being courageous enough to give them honest and helpful feedback, believing that they will appreciate your desire to help them. Of course, you may need to double check your motives to ensure it really is for their edification and not your own feelings.
  • Be trustworthy by providing a safe place where they can let down their guard because they know you won’t share things they wouldn’t want shared. This trustworthiness will become known over time as their trust in you steadily grows.
  • Ask them how you can help them and then do what you can to follow-through on their requests. I’m sure you know that some of their requests might be difficult, but if you follow-through on them it will be noticed because, as the old expression goes, “if it were easy, anyone would do it.”
  • You might also pray for them. Prayer really does make a difference for people. It also makes a difference in how you view someone when you start praying for them.

Do you know a leader who might benefit from you reaching out to them? Maybe you could do the things mentioned above or maybe you could just offer a thank you for all that they do for you and others. While they may seem like they don’t need your kind gesture, I guarantee that they will appreciate it.

 

 

About the author: Rodger Price is an executive coach and author. He owns and leads Leading by DESIGN, a company committed to helping West Michigan people become amazing leaders who drive for excellence while serving and caring for those in their charge.

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